Dangerous solar storm moving towards Earth, NASA gave this warning

The US space agency NASA has reported that a large solar storm is moving towards the Earth. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on Tuesday captured a very powerful glow emanating from the Sun. NASA has said that according to local time, the solar flare was at its peak at around 9:55 am. It is classified as having an X-class flare, which means it can be effective. The image shared by NASA tells about the ultraviolet (UV) lights emanating very fast from the Sun.

Solar flares are phenomena when there are powerful explosions of radiation from the Sun. These eruptions can last from a few minutes to hours. The harmful radiation emanating from it can reach the Earth’s atmosphere. Although it does not physically affect humans, it can affect radio communication, electric power grids, navigation signals. It can pose a danger to space craft and astronauts.

NASA The Key Solar Dynamics Observatory has been observing the Sun since 2010. Because of this, scientists are understanding the nearest star to us closely.

Solar storms emanating from the Sun are classified according to their intensity. This allows scientists to determine how severe a solar storm is. The weakest solar storms fall in the A-class, B-class and C-class. M-class storms are the most powerful and there is a possibility of them hitting our Earth.

X-class solar flares cause explosions in the Sun. When their target is towards Earth, due to this, the danger to satellites and astronauts increases. These explosions can also affect power stations and radio signals. The solar flare that has been spotted now is an X1.5 flare. That is, it is an X category solar flare. This has led to warnings of shortwave radio blackouts in the Atlantic Ocean region. It is expected that it will soon hit our Earth in the form of a solar storm.

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