Problems in the availability of coal in the country, the rest of the demand should be met through imports: Government

The Ministry of Coal has said that the availability of coal domestically in the country is getting hampered.

The Ministry of Coal has said that the availability of coal domestically in the country is getting hampered. He said that in such a situation, there is a need to meet the remaining demand of coal through imports.

Ministry of Coal has said that domestically in the country coal (coal) availability is hindered. He said that in such a situation the rest of the demand for coal (Demand) import to (Import) needs to be completed through The ministry has also emphasized that coal block holders – both captive (own use) and commercial – face the problem of coal. (Coal Crisis) role in reducing According to the Additional Secretary in the Ministry of Coal, the domestic coal production is 800 million tonnes. He also heads the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Contracts for Supply of Coal to the Power Sector.

The Inter-Ministerial Committee met recently, in which contracts related to coal supply to power plants of the Central/States were considered. Apart from this, the status of existing coal supply to power plants was also reviewed. Additional Coal Secretary said that there are constraints in the availability of domestic coal. Domestic coal production is around 800 million tonnes.

Several reasons for shortage of coal in power plants

According to the minutes of the meeting, the Additional Secretary said that due to constraints in the availability of coal domestically, the rest of the demand should be met through imports.

Earlier, Coal Secretary AK Jain had said that there are many reasons for the shortage of coal in power plants. For this, factors such as increase in demand for electricity due to the boom in the economy after Kovid-19, early summer, increase in the prices of imported coal and gas and a sharp decline in the production of coastal thermal power plants are responsible.

Apart from this, let us tell you that thermal power plants may soon have to pay preventive charges or a kind of fine to various power distribution companies (discoms) for keeping coal reserves less than the stipulated. The Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC) has sought views of stakeholders on the process of calculation of these charges. CERC has issued a public notice on May 13, 2022, seeking views from stakeholders.

Feedback can be given by 27 May 2022. It has also been proposed to amend the 2019 Tariff Rules to calculate the preventive duty on the basis of the average availability of coal reserves for the last three months.

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